June Reading

 

I love to read. When I get hooked into a book, I can sit in the same spot for hours immersed in the altered reality the book provides for me. Here are the books I read in June.

june books

 

-12 Years a Slave-

I borrowed this book from the University library one day while I was browsing their general section. I have yet to see the movie, but I am assuming it is as heart-breaking as the book. This gut-renching tale is of a free man getting sold to slavery in the 1800’s.

According to Goodreads: “Solomon Northup was a free-born African American from Saratoga Springs, New York. He is noted for having been kidnapped in 1841 when enticed with a job offer. When he accompanied his supposed employers to Washington, DC, they drugged him and sold him into slavery. From Washington, DC, he was transported to New Orleans where he was sold to a plantation owner from Rapides Parish, Louisiana. After 12 years in bondage, he regained his freedom in January 1853”

At some points, the written language of the book is confusing to read, but it adds an authenticity to the memoir.

Last summer, I visited a plantation in North Carolina, and walked along the same dirt paths as they had. It was an emotional experience, and I suggest its one everyone should experience.

 

-Creative Writing: Four Genres in Brief-

This is my current Textbook for my Creative Writing course. It provides great examples and concrete terms to guide the reader through the text.

According to Goodreads: “How can students with widely varied levels of literary experience learn to write poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and drama — over the course of only one semester? In Creative Writing: Four Genres in Brief, David Starkey offers some solutions to the challenges of teaching the introductory creative writing course: (1) concise, accessible instruction in literary basics; (2) short models of literature to analyze, admire and emulate; (3) inventive and imaginative assignments that inspire and motivate”

I like the ideas the textbook provide; ideas to brainstorm ideas, to methods to write poetry.

 

-Gone Girl-

THIS BOOK WAS FANTASTIC. This physiological thriller was glued to my hands; I could not put it down. My sister is currently finishing this book up. Hayley can you read it faster so we can gossip about the characters!? 

According to Goodreads:On a warm summer morning in North Carthage, Missouri, it is Nick and Amy Dunne’s fifth wedding anniversary. Presents are being wrapped and reservations are being made when Nick’s clever and beautiful wife disappears. Husband-of-the-Year Nick isn’t doing himself any favors with cringe-worthy daydreams about the slope and shape of his wife’s head, but passages from Amy’s diary reveal the alpha-girl perfectionist could have put anyone dangerously on edge. Under mounting pressure from the police and the media—as well as Amy’s fiercely doting parents—the town golden boy parades an endless series of lies, deceits, and inappropriate behavior. Nick is oddly evasive, and he’s definitely bitter—but is he really a killer?”

As a Goodreads 2012 Choice, It’s a prize-winning book full of thought provoking commentary on the psychology  of relationships — and how much you know your partner.

I heard some gossip that this novel is in the works of becoming a film, and low-and-behold there is a preview! Enjoy:

 

I do hope this movie adds up to the emotional outpour of the novel. Although all book lovers know: The books is always better than the movie. 

 

-On Writing-

This was one of my required readings for my Theory of Creative Writing Class during the first 5 weeks of my summer classes. I had read only one of Stephen King’s books : 11/22/63, and loved his style of writing. Although lengthy — 11/22/63 contained over 600 pages, I flew through the story enjoying the writing and the character development.

This book, however was a memoir and writing class all bundled into one. I learned the struggles King endured, and the persistence he had to publish his writing.

According to Goodreads:Part memoir, part master class by one of the bestselling authors of all time, this superb volume is a revealing and practical view of the writer’s craft, comprising the basic tools of the trade every writer must have. King’s advice is grounded in his vivid memories from childhood through his emergence as a writer, from his struggling early career to his widely reported near-fatal accident in 1999 — and how the inextricable link between writing and living spurred his recovery. Brilliantly structured, friendly and inspiring, “On Writing” will empower and entertain everyone who reads it — fans, writers, and anyone who loves a great story well told

I’ll be posting soon an update of my July books soon. I haven’t gone to the library in a few days, and I’m itching to pick up another novel. I am open to  suggestions, and would love to hear your favorite summer reads.

lyndsay paige

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