Shish Kabobs and New Jobs

Being a grown-up is hard sometimes. When are you officially considered “Grown-up” Anyways? I wouldn’t consider myself a full-fledge, black-coffee drinking, 9-5 working, suit strutting, grown up yet. I’m too young for that! I still enjoy running amok in grocery stores, and buying dripping ice cream cones covered in rainbow sprinkles. Everyone eventually grows up, and with that being said, one must pick out their nicest outfit and endure the frightful experience called the job interview.

I’ve worked since I was in high school in various jobs which I found to be both pleasing, and challenging. My first “real job” landed me in a retirement home kitchen at the age of 18. I was still in High School, and decided I needed a job to allow for growth of my culinary career. Starting as a waitress, I learned the name’s and favorite’s of the seventy-five residents who called this place their home. Gerry liked getting cheese omelets everyday because of his teeth, but Louise enjoyed poking fun at her husband as she nibbled on bits of carrot. Jean would hide her food in different containers at her table. I once found a piece of chicken stuffed inside of the salt shaker. I kept her table bare aside from her plate from that point forward.

After a month, I was granted reins to the kitchen, solely producing meals for the residents at night. I created my own menus and interviewed the residents about their favorite childhood meals. I loved seeing their reactions when I made Challah just as good as their mother’s. I had a resident sneak into the kitchen one night, as I was baking up some cookies. “Lyndsay, I wanted to thank you for making me that Challah last night. My mother used to make it every Friday night for us, and I’ve missed it dearly since moving here. It’s nice to have such sweet jewish girl in the kitchen now!”

I worked at the retirement home until I had started up my classes at the local college. I had run out of time in my schedule, and school was ( and always will be) my first priority. I started working for the restaurant at the school, and slowly became the front-of-house manager of the student run restaurant. When the restaurant moved into a larger location, I was moved back into the kitchen and worked on the line as expeditor and grill cook.

Not all jobs work out like you hope. When I was living in Oregon, I got a job with a local pizza guy who sold pizzas from a little street cart. I looked upon this new endeavor with hopes of making dough, sauces, and creating unique pizzas. The owner, on the other hand, saw me as a human to roll out 300 mini pizza doughs by hand. At the end of the first day my back was so sore, I could barely stand. I told the owner that I could not work in these physical conditions and he decided to not pay me for the 3 training days I had spend with him.

Another time I was hired on as a pastry chef at a new bakery. I was given the freedom to create whatever treats I wanted, but I realized I did not like working in bakeries. What irked me the most was the assumption that I wanted a full-time job. No. I wanted a part-time job because I was busy. Instead the owner relied tasks to me like I was a partner of the bakery…without the cash benefits. Her and I were the sole work-horses of the place,(With her half the time in the front of the shop) and at the time I was going through a severe bought of depression. I thought working with cookies and cakes would help me. It just made it worse. The thing that really ticked me off about the place was the owner’s husband. He would come in the back and stick his hands into everything I was working on, then change my music I was listening to, to christian rock. He would leave the room, I would change it back to my tunes. And I wasn’t listening to something obscene like Hip-hop or anything, I was listening to smooth jazz! Boom, he would walk in and switch the dial to christian rock. It drove me absolutely insane. I couldn’t handle the pressure of the job anymore and had to step down.

The other day I interviewed for an office position at a local children’s learning center. Although it’s not in the culinary field, I am reaching out to places I would love to work with. Somewhere with air-conditioning and a slower pace than a kitchen. I wanted to include a few interviewing tips for my fellow young adults:

7 Tips to Perfecting The Job Interview 

1.Research

Research the company and it’s main goals. Find out why you should apply to this company, rather than the other down the street. If any of your friends work there, ask their opinions on the place and take their options with a grain of salt. The lazy employee friend might not like the place, but it could be a perfect fit for you.

2. Revise Your Resume

Look over your resume and add any new skills you have acquired, or past jobs that highlight experiences that showcase the job at hand.

3. Be on Time

Always show up for interviews 15 minutes before your appointed time. It’s better to wait rather than to rush in flustered.

4. Bring Copies of your Resume

Bring a copy of your resume with you to your interview. You can refer to it throughout the interview.

5. Smile!

This one is the easiest! Smile throughout your entire interview; even if it is a phone interview. People will hire friendly employees over rude employees with good resumes.

6. Dress to Impress

Always arrive to both the picking up of an application, dropping off of an application, and interview in nice clothes. It does not need to be a suit, but a nice fitted outfit presents you as a good employee.

7. The Thank You Letter 

A week after the interview, send a thank you email to the person who interviewed you. This will surely keep you in the front of their mind when making decisions.

 

Ahh! Enough with the adult stuff— Here’s what you really like, food! 

My sister was really craving shish kebabs the other night, and I had to make some for her. We had went to this new meat market earlier in the day, and I was excited to add another CookBook Challenge under my belt … literally.

I decided to marinate the meat in a beer marinade courtesy of “Great Good Food” by Julee Rosso. This 575 page book contains a whopping amount of healthy recipes and ideas. Shish Kabob

The Kebab as a cooking method, derives from 17th century BCE in ancient Greece. It is said the soldiers would grill their meats on their swords over a cooking fire.

This marinade coats the meat in a tenderizing liquid, making the steak juicy and tender. I paired the meat with an assortment of vegetables and a side of rice.

Beer Marinated Shish Kabobs

  • Servings: 6
  • Time: 1 1/2 Hours
  • Print

Ingredients

1 pound Sirloin Steak, cut into cubes

1/2 Cup Dijon Mustard

1/2 Cup Red Wine Vinegar

1 Cup Beer ( I used Corona)

1/4 Cup light brown sugar

2 Tablespoons chopped Tarragon

Freshly Ground Pepper

Assorted Vegetables to Grill ( I used Zucchini, Tomato, Mushrooms, and Peppers)

Method

  1. Mix Marinade ingredients together in large ziploc bag, large enough to hold meat and marinade. Add Meat and marinade in fridge for 1-2 hours
  2. Thread the meat and vegetables onto skewers, alternating colors and textures.
  3. Prepare grill for cooking.
  4.  Cook the skewers on the grill for 8-10 minutes, turning accordingly.

This recipe was provided by Great Good Food, Julee Rosso. 

Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life. — Confucius

lyndsay paige

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